Tag: Victorian

Fashionable Frocks of 1860

Flounced Dresses, Journal des Jeunes Personnes, 1860.
(Met Museum)

When it comes to Victorian fashion, it is often difficult to choose a favourite year—or even a favourite decade.  The romantic gowns of the 1830s vie with the enormous crinolines of the 1860s which, in turn, rival the sleek, bustled skirts of the 1870s. As someone who researches and writes extensively on historical fashion, choosing the year in which to set my new romance novel, The Lost Letter, had as much to do with the style of dress as it did with other considerations. In today’s post, we take a brief look at some of the styles which were popular in 1860, the year in which The Lost Letter begins.[…]Continue Reading

The Lost Letter: Book Excerpt and Goodreads Giveaway

The Lost Letter Pre-Launch Giveaway

As many of you know, my debut Victorian romance, The Lost Letter, will be released on September 19. It’s currently out on review and—I’m pleased to report—the advance reviews have been truly wonderful. Kirkus Reviews calls it a “beautifully told” historical love story with “consistently refined and elegant” prose. And Chicks, Rogues and Scandals calls it “flawless” and “one of those books that you keep on the bookshelf forever.” Unfortunately, it will be seven more weeks before you can read The Lost Letter and judge for yourselves. In the meanwhile, I’m very excited to unveil the first chapter of my novel here on my website. […]Continue Reading

The Etiquette of the Victorian Golf Course: Twelve Tips for a Co-Ed Game

Illustration of a Woman Playing Golf by Ellen Clapsaddle, 1902.
(Sally Fox Collection, Harvard Library)

During the Victorian era, golf was a hugely popular sport. Both men and women played for pleasure and for competition. Much of this play was done in the company of those of the same sex. However, by the end of the century, it was becoming more common for men and women—especially husbands and wives—to golf together. As a result, many magazines and journals of the day offered advice to men on how to conduct themselves on the golf course when in the presence of a lady. They also offered advice to women on what they must and must not do in order to be accepted as ‘a popular member of the club.’[…]Continue Reading

A Victorian Wife's Best Friend: The Role of Cats & Dogs in Cases of Spousal Abuse

Her Favourites by John Charlton, 1881.

The nineteenth century news is filled with reports of hero pets rescuing their masters and mistresses from various catastrophes. Dogs routed burglars and saved children from drowning, while cats meowed the alarm when the house was on fire or when a family member had stopped breathing in their bed. Both cats and dogs were also known to intervene in cases of spousal abuse. For a battered Victorian wife, this animal intervention could sometimes mean the difference between life and death. […]Continue Reading

A Few Words on Disappearing Posts…

The Letter by Jan van Beers, 1885.

Some of you may have noticed that my archive of articles on Victorian fashion and beauty has recently become a bit thinner. I know that many of those articles—specifically my Victorian Lady’s Guides and my Visual Guides to Victorian Fashion series—were incredibly popular, so I thought I’d take a brief moment to explain what has happened to them.[…]Continue Reading