Tag: Victorian

The Winter Companion Release Day: Blog Tour, Giveaway, & More!

It’s release day for The Winter Companion (Parish Orphan of Devon, Book 4)! To celebrate, I’ll be embarking on a virtual book tour this week, complete with interviews, reviews, and a giveaway. You can also find me at Frolic with an exclusive excerpt, at Reading is My Super Power for their Kissing Books spotlight and giveaway, and tomorrow, I’ll be over at Fresh Fiction with a special Winter Companion-themed Valentine’s Day recipe (and another giveaway!). To top it all off, the eBook price of The Winter Companion is reduced to just $2.99 for the entire week![…]Continue Reading

Ether for Every Occasion: Wedding Nights, Frolics, and Flammable Binges

The First Use of Ether in Dental Surgery By Ernest Board, 1846.
(Wellcome Images, CC BY 4.0)

Derived from ethyl alcohol, ether was a sweet-smelling, colorless liquid that came into medical prominence in the nineteenth century. When vaporized and inhaled, it produced varying degrees of unconsciousness. First employed as a general anesthetic by American doctors in the 1840s, its popularity quickly spread to Victorian England. But ether wasn’t only used during surgeries. It was also used recreationally, as well as to address myriad calamities of life in ways that ranged from the mundane to the outright creepy.[…]Continue Reading

A Victorian Lady's Guide to Fashion and Beauty Paperback Release Day!

Today my non-fiction fashion history book A Victorian Lady’s Guide to Fashion and Beauty is out in paperback in the United States! It’s already available everywhere else in both ebook and paperback. I apologize that it’s taken so long for it to be available in the U.S. (and I doubly apologize if it’s already back-ordered here). […]Continue Reading

Victorian Dining Etiquette: Common Sense Advice for Eating in Company

Dinner by Albert von Keller, 1891.

With the holiday season well under way, it seems an appropriate time to review a few of the many Victorian era rules for dining in company. The etiquette of the table hasn’t changed a great deal over the years. Some rules are merely a matter of basic common sense. Nevertheless, we could all do with a refresher now and then. To that end, I’ve gathered ten tips from various Victorian era etiquette books and articles addressing the basics of dining etiquette. I present them to you below.[…]Continue Reading

A Halloween Tea Party for Unmarried Victorian Ladies

Ladies Taking Tea by Joseph Scheurenberg, n.d.

In the Victorian era, Halloween parties were rife with games designed to help young ladies see into their marital futures. These games were generally played at co-ed Halloween celebrations. There were even some which could be played by gentlemen. The bulk of these games, however, were geared toward marriage-minded females. It is therefore not surprising to find descriptions of Halloween parties—or Halloween Teas—that were strictly for women.[…]Continue Reading

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