Tag: Victorian Era

The Spinster’s Numeration Table: A Guide for Nineteenth Century Men

An Encounter at the Spinning Wheel by George Goodwin Kilburne , n.d.

Recently, while researching, I came across a “Spinster’s Numeration Table” printed in the 1837 edition of the New Monthly Magazine. This table lists out the various ages of an unmarried woman and corresponds them to certain characteristics. It is meant to be humorous, but—as with all humor of this sort—there is a grain of historical truth to be gleaned from the descriptions. The table gives us insight into how spinsters were viewed and at what age unmarried women were deemed to be past their prime.[…]Continue Reading

Victorian Handcuff Bracelets for Engagement and Marriage

The New Bracelet by Frans Verhas, (1827-1897).

Gold bracelets and bangles were popular throughout the Victorian era. They came in a variety of styles, including thin bracelets, heavy bracelets, and bracelets adorned with jewels. Most were fairly commonplace in appearance; however, in the late nineteenth century, a new style emerged on the scene in the form of gold bracelets made to look—and sometimes function—like handcuffs. As the 1879 edition of Godey’s Lady’s Book reports;[…]Continue Reading

Winners of The Lost Letter Release Day Giveaway!

The Reply by Auguste Toulmouche, n.d.
(Musee des Beaux-Arts)

Last week, I offered a Victorian-themed letter writing giveaway to celebrate the release of my debut historical romance novel The Lost Letter. This giveaway was open to all my subscribers. The grand prize included:[…]Continue Reading

The Lost Letter: The Story Behind the Story

The Reader by Charles Baugniet, n.d.

I don’t usually blog about my writing process. However, since this is launch week for my debut Victorian romance The Lost Letter, I thought I’d share with you a little bit about how the story came into being. For those of you who have read it, you’ll know that it’s dedicated to my mother.[…]Continue Reading

A Simple Coiffure: Basic Hairstyles for Victorian Women of Moderate Means

Hair styled with a center parting and plaits.
(An Embroidery Lesson by Gustave Leonard de Jonghe, 1864.)

For balls and other formal events, fashionable women of the early 1860s often arranged their hair in elaborate styles with artificial tufts, pads, and false plaits. On a day-to-day basis, however, Victorian women of more moderate means stuck to more practical styles. These styles included firmly pinned plaits, simple chignons, and rolls bound up in a hair net or secured with a ribbon. In today’s post, we take a brief look at some of these styles, specifically those which feature in my new Victorian romance novel The Lost Letter.[…]Continue Reading