Tag: Animal History

The Winter Companion Release Day: Blog Tour, Giveaway, & More!

It’s release day for The Winter Companion (Parish Orphan of Devon, Book 4)! To celebrate, I’ll be embarking on a virtual book tour this week, complete with interviews, reviews, and a giveaway. You can also find me at Frolic with an exclusive excerpt, at Reading is My Super Power for their Kissing Books spotlight and giveaway, and tomorrow, I’ll be over at Fresh Fiction with a special Winter Companion-themed Valentine’s Day recipe (and another giveaway!). To top it all off, the eBook price of The Winter Companion is reduced to just $2.99 for the entire week![…]Continue Reading


A Parisian Dog Arrested for Theft

Newfoundland by Carl Reichert (1836–1918), n.d.

In December of 1888, the Gloucester Citizen reported on the arrest of a Parisian dog thief. Mind you, this was not a human who dognapped canines. It was, in fact, a dog who regularly absconded with goods from the fashionable shops of Paris. This dog thief is described as “a big Newfoundland.” On the day of his arrest, he entered a large shop located near the Bastille. According to the Gloucester Citizen:[…]Continue Reading


Companion Dogs as Seers, Healers, and Fairy Steeds

Johnson’s Household Book of Nature, 1880.

When considering dog folklore, we generally think of those stories which feature the Grimm, the Gytrash, or other sinister black dogs roaming the moors in the North of England. But there is more to canine folklore than the ominous black dogs of legend. Companion dogs, such as pugs and corgis, have their place in dog folklore as well.[…]Continue Reading


The Pug Who Bit Napoleon U.S. Release Day!

Today is the United States release of my non-fiction animal history book The Pug Who Bit Napoleon: Animal Tales of the 18th and 19th Centuries! The paperback is now available in the U.S. and can be purchased at Amazon and other online or brick and mortar booksellers.
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Feline Dress Improvers: The Victorian Fashion in Bustle Baskets for Cats

“As the basket was padded and lined with satin, and bedizened with fringe and ribbons, pussy did not object to being a prisoner therein, and to being placed on the lady’s bustle as a pack.”

Truth, 1887

Kittens at Play by Henriette Ronner-Knip (1821-1909).

During the mid-1880s, the silhouette of women’s gowns was characterized by the size and shape of the bustle or “dress improver.” Unlike the more moderate-sized dress improvers of the 1870s, the bustle of the 1880s was—at its most extreme—large, protruding, and shelf-like. For fashionable ladies with cats, it provided a convenient ledge on which to strap a satin-lined cat basket.[…]Continue Reading


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