Companion Dogs as Seers, Healers, and Fairy Steeds

Johnson’s Household Book of Nature, 1880.

When considering dog folklore, we generally think of those stories which feature the Grimm, the Gytrash, or other sinister black dogs roaming the moors in the North of England. But there is more to canine folklore than the ominous black dogs of legend. Companion dogs, such as pugs and corgis, have their place in dog folklore as well.[…]Continue Reading

Audiobook Narrator News!

I’m thrilled to announce that my audio publisher, Tantor Media, has cast Justine Eyre to narrate both The Lost Letter and The Viscount and the Vicar’s Daughter. Justine has done the narration for some really fantastic historical romance and historical fiction authors, including Amanda Quick, Eloisa James, Sarah MacLean, and Tasha Alexander. She’s the actress I requested and I feel so lucky she’s agreed to narrate my novels. She has a thoughtful, intelligent, and emotionally sensitive voice which I know will be perfect for bringing my stories to life.[…]Continue Reading

Victorian Romance 99¢ Sale!

 

The eBook versions of The Lost Letter and The Viscount and the Vicar’s Daughter are both on sale this week for 99¢. The sale runs from April 2-April 9 on Amazon and Amazon UK. If you haven’t yet read my Victorian romances, I hope you’ll give them a try! You can click through to Amazon via the links below.[…]Continue Reading

The Pug Who Bit Napoleon U.S. Release Day!

Today is the United States release of my non-fiction animal history book The Pug Who Bit Napoleon: Animal Tales of the 18th and 19th Centuries! The paperback is now available in the U.S. and can be purchased at Amazon and other online or brick and mortar booksellers.
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Mermaids Sightings in the 19th Century

Illustration of a Mermaid, The Brown Fairy Book by H. J. Ford, 1904.

According to historians, tales of mermaids and mermen can be traced back to the Babylonian sea deities Oannes and Atargatis in 1000 BCE. Since then, mermaid folklore has appeared in every era and every culture, from ancient Greece to Victorian England. But mermaid lore was not limited to the realm of folklore and mythology. During the nineteenth century, mermaids appeared with some regularity in art, literature, and music. They also featured in the nineteenth century news, with both sailors and coastal residents reporting real life sightings of mermaids well into the Victorian era.[…]Continue Reading

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