Austen, Heyer, and Pugs featured at A Covent Garden Gilflurt's Guide to Life!

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My article Austen, Heyer, and the Prince of Orange: Pugs in Literature and History is featured today on A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life.  It is one of my most popular articles as well as one of my own personal favorites.  I hope you will stop by and leave a comment!  While you are there, have a look around at some of the other fascinating and well-researched articles on Georgian history.  From art, music, and literature to personal profiles, politics, and the military, Catherine Curzon and her distinguished salon guests have the Georgian era completely covered!

Adaptations and Accuracy: Literary Favorites from Page to Screen

“If, however, your feelings have changed, I will have to tell you, you have bewitched me body and soul, and I love…I love….I love you.”
(Pride and Prejudice, 2005.)

 Photograph: Focus Features.
Keira Knightly and Matthew Macfadyen as Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice, 2005.
Photograph: Focus Features.

If you are a serious, literary-minded Jane Austen fan, it may raise your blood pressure a bit to learn that there are many people who believe the above quote was actually said by Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice.  Similarly, there are those who are convinced that the famous scene where Darcy leaps into the lake at Pemberley is an accurate depiction of something that Austen wrote on the page.  In fact, as most of you reading this will know, the above lines are said by actor Matthew Macfadyen in the 2005 movie version of Pride and Prejudice and the scene with Darcy in the lake is enacted by Colin Firth in the 1995 BBC miniseries.  Neither scene is in the book.[…]Continue Reading

The Character of Cats: Depictions in Georgian and Regency Literature

Un Chat Angora by Jean-Jacques Bachelier, (1724–1806).
Un Chat Angora by Jean-Jacques Bachelier, (1724–1806).

As popular a pet as cats are in modern day households, it was the dog that dominated the home and hearth of the 18th and early 19th century.  Cats had their admirers, of course, amongst whom were such literary luminaries as Samuel Johnson and Lord Byron, but in general, their primary value lay in their ability to keep the premises free from vermin.

[…]Continue Reading

A Soldier Writes Home: Letters from the Georgian Era through World War II

“The field of battle is a festival of honour; a sublime pageant.  But this is war!”
Sir Robert Ker Porter, 1809.

Summoned to Waterloo by Hillingford 1897
Summoned to Waterloo by Robert Alexander Hillingford, 1897.

Whether it is touched upon in conversation between those characters safe on the home front or dealt with directly via a character who has been in the military or is still serving abroad, war is a part of many historical novels.  Indeed, there aren’t many fans of Georgian and Regency fiction who could not recite to you the salient facts of the Battles of Trafalgar or Waterloo.  However, what makes us, as readers, invested in the characters does not come down to a mere recitation of facts on a timeline.  It comes down to emotional authenticity.[…]Continue Reading

“Be Not Alarmed, Madam, On Receiving This Letter…”

Penning a Letter by George Goodwin Kilburne
Penning a Letter by George Goodwin Kilburne, 1839-1924.

The reading and writing of letters plays an important role in many of our most beloved nineteenth century novels.  And it is no wonder why.  In an era defined by its social constraints, a well-written letter can achieve what the characters cannot accomplish through ordinary dialogue. […]Continue Reading

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