Shawls and Wraps in 19th Century Art, Literature, and Fashion History

(Portrait of Olimpia Łosiowa, 1818-1820.)
Portrait of Olimpia Losiowa, 1818-1820.

From the Regency era to the end of the 1860s, there was no fashion accessory as versatile and ubiquitous as the shawl.  Available in all weights of fabrics, including silk, lace, muslin, and cashmere wool, and priced for all budgets, shawls graced the shoulders of women in every strata of society.  They were no less well-represented in art and literature of the day.  Shawls were referenced in the novels of such literary luminaries as Elizabeth Gaskell and William Makepeace Thackeray.  They were also featured in countless portrait paintings, draping the figures of fashionable 19th century ladies of every age.

Portrait of an Unknown Woman by Alexander Molinari, 1800.
Portrait of an Unknown Woman
by Alexander Molinari, 1800.

The lightweight Empire-style gowns of the Regency era provided little protection against the elements.  As a result, shawls and wraps were a practical necessity.  In Jane Austen’s novel Emma (1815), Miss Bates insists that her mother wear a shawl when she goes visiting.  Miss Bates and her mother are not wealthy by any means.  For them, the shawl as an accessory is purely utilitarian.  As Miss Bates explains to her guests:

I made her take her shawl—for the evenings are not warm—her large new shawl— Mrs. Dixon’s wedding-present.—So kind of her to think of my mother!  Bought at Weymouth, you know—Mr. Dixon’s choice.  There were three others, Jane says, which they hesitated about some time.

For those ladies of means, a shawl could be as fashionable as it was eminently practical.  The 1806 edition of La Belle Assemblée describes the current fashion in shawls as follows:

Large shawls of silk or mohair were also much worn, and in various shapes; some in the form of a flowing mantle, appending from the shoulders, with a hood; others à la Turque; others again square.  But the most elegantly simple style of either the shawl or Egyptian mantle that arrested the fancy, were those of plain or japanned white muslin, with a large Egyptian border of deep green, in tambour or embroidery.

A Variety of ways of Wearing Shawls in early 19th century France, Lithograph, 1802-1814.
A Variety of ways of Wearing Shawls in early 19th century France, Lithograph, 1802-1814.

The fashion in shawls changed little over the years.  A plain background with a variegated border was still the ideal.  The 1812 issue of La Belle Assemblée reports that for winter dress fashions:

…a fine cashemire [sic] shawl, with brown background, and richly variegated border, is generally thrown over the dress, in which is united both comfort and elegance.

And for the spring dress fashions:

…over these is thrown, in elegant drapery, a long Indian shawl of the scarf kind, the colour of the palest Ceylon ruby, the ends enriched by a variegated border…

Portrait of a Young Lady in a Red Dress with a Paisley Shawl by Eduard Friedrich Leybold, 1824.
Portrait of a Young Lady in a Red Dress with a Paisley Shawl by Eduard Friedrich Leybold, 1824.

Throughout much of the 19th century, cashmere (or Kashmir) shawls were at the forefront of elegant fashion in scarves and wraps.  Made from the wool of the sheep in the Kashmir region of India, they were as luxuriously soft as they were warm.  In William Thackeray’s novel Vanity Fair (1848), Amelia Sedley’s brother Joseph brings her back two white cashmere shawls from India.  These shawls are much coveted by Becky Sharp.  Thackeray writes:

When Rebecca saw the two magnificent Cashmere shawls which Joseph Sedley had brought home to his sister, she said, with perfect truth, ‘that it must be delightful to have a brother,’ and easily got the pity of the tender-hearted Amelia for being alone in the world, an orphan without friends or kindred.

Portrait of Carolina Frederica Kerst by Charles Van Beveren, 1830.
Portrait of Carolina Frederica Kerst by Charles Van Beveren, 1830.

As the century progressed, ladies fashions evolved.  Skirts grew bigger and so did sleeves.  Waistlines lowered and instead of a single petticoat, a lady now wore several.  One might expect shawls and wraps to have become less popular.  Women were surely warmer now in all their layers.  However, as a fashion accessory the shawl continued to be as vitally important to a woman’s dress as it ever had – and those shawls and wraps from India still reigned supreme.

A lady in a white dress and shawl before a Viennese landscape by Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, mid-19th century.
A lady in a white dress and shawl before a Viennese landscape by Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, mid-19th century.

In Margaret Gaskell’s novel North and South (1855), Margaret Hale is asked to model her aunt’s collection of “beautiful Indian shawls.”  Gaskell writes:

[Margaret] touched the shawls gently as they hung around her, and took a pleasure in their soft feel and their brilliant colours, and rather liked to be dressed in such splendour— enjoying it much as a child would do, with a quiet pleased smile on her lips.

The shawls in North and South had been given to Margaret’s aunt upon her marriage and were now being given to Margaret’s cousin, Edith, upon hers.  A generation had not diminished their value.  As one guest says whilst admiring them:

Helen had set her heart upon an Indian shawl, but really when I found what an extravagant price was asked, I was obliged to refuse her.  She will be quite envious when she hears of Edith having Indian shawls.  What kind are they?  Delhi? with the lovely little borders?

Portrait of Elizabeth Wethered Barringer by Federica de Madrazo, 1852.
Portrait of Elizabeth Wethered Barringer by Federica de Madrazo, 1852.

Shawls and wraps are well represented in all the works of Charles Dickens, from the “pinched bonnet and poor little shawl” of Miss Flyte in Bleak House (1852) to the grand aspirations of Herbert Pocket in Great Expectations (1860).  In the latter novel, Pip relates a conversation with Herbert which gives us some insight into the continuing popularity of the Indian shawl:

‘I think I shall trade,’ said [Herbert], leaning back in his chair, ‘to the East Indies, for silks, shawls, spices, dyes, drugs, and precious woods.  It’s an interesting trade.’

‘And the profits are large?’ said I.

‘Tremendous!’ said he.

I wavered again, and began to think here were greater expectations than my own.

Portrait of Fanny Holman Hunt by William Holman Hunt, 1866-1867.
Portrait of Fanny Holman Hunt by William Holman Hunt, 1866-1867.

By the 1870s, the popularity of the cashmere shawl was in decline.  This had less to do with the dictates of fashion and more with global politics and famine.  As Sir Walter Roper Lawrence writes in his book The Valley of Kashmir (1895):

The shawl industry is now unfortunately a tradition – a memory of the past.  The trade received its deathblow when war broke out between Germany and France in 1870, and I have been told by an eye-witness of the intense excitement and interest with which the Kashmiri shawl-weavers watched the fate of France in that great struggle – bursting into tears and loud lamentations when the news of Germany’s victories reached them.

He goes on to write that any hope of the shawl weaving industry being revived was dashed when famine visited the Valley of Kashmir in 1877-1879.  According to Lawrence, none suffered so greatly during that famine than the poor shawl-weavers.

This did not mean that shawls and wraps as a whole were unpopular.  Whether made of gauze, silk, or lace, a well-draped shawl was still an integral part of women’s fashions well into the 20th century.  Even today, shawls and wraps have their place in the wardrobe of any well-dressed lady.  And as you can see from the portraits I have included, precious little about the patterns and draping of shawls has changed since the early Regency.

The Shawl by Charles Sprague Pearce, 1900.
The Shawl by Charles Sprague Pearce, 1900.

In closing, I will add that for an author of historical romance a shawl can be a wonderful prop.  How many times has a critical conversation been overheard by a young lady who has returned to a room to retrieve the shawl she had left behind?  And how many times has a gentleman been sent out to the carriage or back into the house to fetch his lady’s forgotten wrap?  There are impoverished characters who disguise an old gown with a decorative shawl and wanton characters who greet their lover wearing a shawl and nothing else.  Classic literature provides us with countless examples of how to utilize a shawl as a prop or plot device and historical romance novels provide us with many more.  The only limit is your imagination.

Mimi Matthews is the author of The Pug Who Bit Napoleon: Animal Tales of the 18th and 19th Centuries (to be released by Pen and Sword Books in November 2017).  She researches and writes on all aspects of nineteenth century history—from animals, art, and etiquette to fashion, beauty, feminism, and law. 

Sources

Austen, Jane.  Emma.  Ed. George Justice.  Norton Critical Editions. 4th ed. New York: Norton, 2011.

Dickens, Charles. Bleak House. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1977.

Dickens, Charles. Great Expectations. London: Penguin Classics, 2002.

Gaskell, Elizabeth.  North and South.  1855.  Project Gutenberg.  Web.

La Belle Assemblée. Vol. 1. London: J. Bell, 1806.

La Belle Assemblée. Vol. 5. London: J. Bell, 1812.

Lawrence, Sir Walter Roper. The Valley of Kashmir. London: Asian Educational Services, 1895.

Thackeray, William Makepeace.  Vanity Fair.  Ed. Peter Shillingsburg.  Norton Critical Editions. 1st ed. New York: Norton, 1994.


Available Now

The Lost Letter
A Victorian Romance

England, 1860. An impoverished beauty is unexpectedly reunited with the beastly earl who jilted her three years before. Will they finally find their happily ever after? Or are some fairy-tale endings simply not meant to be? Find out more…

ORDER TODAY for $2.99 or
FREE on KINDLE UNLIMITED!

Amazon | Amazon UK


Advance Praise for The Lost Letter

“This sweet story is the perfect quick read for fans of Regency romances as well as Victorian happily-ever-afters, with shades of Austen and the Brontës that create an entertaining blend of drama and romance.” -RT Book Reviews

“Debut author Matthews adroitly captures the internal conflicts of her two main characters…The author’s prose is consistently refined and elegant, and she memorably builds the simmering attraction between Sylvia and Sebastian.” –Kirkus Reviews

“A fast and emotionally satisfying read, with two characters finding the happily-ever-after they had understandably given up on. A promising debut.” -Library Journal

“An extremely romantic and emotional story… The characters are so realistic and just walk off the page and into your heart. This love story will stay in my memory for some time to come. This is a definite keeper that I can highly recommend.” -The Romance Reviews

“Absolutely remarkable!…Right up there with the best books I have read this year…Beautiful, romantic and emotionally shattering…One of those books that you keep on the bookshelf forever…Flawless!” -Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

“In a sweet Victorian setting, Beauty and the Beast is retold in a two and a half hour read that will have your heart doing somersaults the whole time.” -Book Ink Reviews


© 2015-2017 Mimi Matthews

For exclusive information on upcoming book releases, giveaways, and other special treats, subscribe to Mimi’s newsletter THE PENNY NOT SO DREADFUL.

You can also connect with Mimi on Facebook and Twitter.

Leave a Reply

24 Comments on "Shawls and Wraps in 19th Century Art, Literature, and Fashion History"

Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Sarah Waldock
Guest

A splendid post, very entertaining, informative and thought-provoking. And yes, I’ve used shawls….

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Thanks Sarah :) It could have been triple the length – there’s so much historical info on shawls!

Pam Shropshire
Guest

Lovely post about shawls and wraps, which are one of my favorite fashion accessories. As you mention, shawls have had a comeback in recent years. One only needs to google to see the wide array of current popular styles. Shawls are also very popular in crochet and knitting pattern books – I’m an avid crocheter – and I have several that I have made, some heavier and utilitarian and some lovely trifles to brighten up a LBD on a night out on the town.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Glad you liked it, Pam. Shawls are one of my favorite fashion accessories as well. And you have it exactly right regarding brightening up a Little Black Dress – one of the best uses for a big fancy shawl!

Sarah Waldock
Guest

And now I’m reading your regency, and finding Philly not permitted to use her shawl to cover a low cut gown, I am seeing how you use it!

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Now you can see firsthand how all of my research works its way into my novels!

Angelyn
Guest

Oh, the wanton meeting her lover with nothing but a shawl! Why didn’t I think of that?

The portraits you’ve chosen are fine illustrations.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Thanks Angelyn :) I’m in love with the paintings of shawls – and there are so many more I would have liked to use!

Vickie
Guest

Mimi – I love this article on shawls – they can turn any combination of dress into a dramatic presentation – lovely to see in history – wonderful to play with now.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Shawls are so versatile! And they’re the only article of Regency clothing that women can still wear everyday :)

Miss Margo
Guest

I loved this post! I’m not a huge fashion person, but, for some reason, I love to read about historical costumes and beauty rituals. This was a treat. Also, the selection of paintings is perfect.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Margo. The descriptions of fashion trends, fabrics, and colors in lady’s magazines of the Regency have always intrigued me, too!

suzanlauder
Guest

Okay, this is too weird. I posted my regular series this morning, and forgot to hashtag the title. So I went in and tweeted it with the #MondayBlogs hashtag, then went to the others to see what I’d re-tweet, and saw— this post! SAME TOPIC! We’re sharing a mind. It’s going on as a complimentary link, and I’m re-tweeting! Hahaha! http://suzanlauder.merytonpress.com/a-pretty-wrap-to-keep-out-the-chill-regency-shawls/

Mimi Matthews
Guest

It must be the coming fall that has everyone thinking about shawls! Thanks for linking my site in your blog post, Suzan :)

Sarah Waldock
Guest

It’d be nice to leave a comment on your site too, Suzan, I wish I knew why I am ‘forbidden’!

Handynummer Orten
Guest

When Pashmina wool is used for the embroidery work, it is made to blend so intimately with the texture of the basic shawl material that it would be difficult to insert even a fine needle between the embroidery stitches and the bas 1000 ic fabric. It was he who began the fashion of wearing them in duplicate, sewn back to back, so that the under surfaces of the shawls were never seen.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Fascinating info! I had no idea of the intricacy involved in embroidering with Pashmina wool. Thanks for commenting :)

woostersauce2014
Guest

An excellent juxtaposition of fashion, history and literature as well as the versatility of such an accessory which can complement an outfit or enhance it. The selection of paintings was good too.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Thanks so much! Shawls were indeed very versatile. And they have changed little since the 19th century. I like to them of them as a Regency era fashion accessory that ladies can still wear today :)

woostersauce2014
Guest

Plus the fact that they have always been an affordable accessory and practical too – a clever way to brighten up an outfit, to keep warm and to rejuvenate an old dress.

Mimi Matthews
Guest

Exactly!

woostersauce2014
Guest

Especially as we will be moving into autumn soon :)

trackback

[…] still manage to pop up in purely practical ways.  So next time you are out and about wearing your Regency era shawl, don’t forget to bring along your 19th century lorgnette.  It is yet another historical […]

trackback

[…] SHAWLS AND WRAPS IN 19TH CENTURY ART, LITERATURE, AND FASHION HISTORY […]

wpDiscuz