The Literary Governess: Depictions in Austen, Brontë, Thackeray, and Heyer

The Governess by Richard Redgrave, 1844.
The Governess by Richard Redgrave, 1844.

During the 19th century, a gently bred young lady with no fortune, no family, and no prospects had few options for making her way in the world.  She might hire herself out as a companion, of course.  Or if she was particularly adept with a needle, she might take in a bit of sewing.  Both were respectable, genteel occupations for a lady down on her luck and, as such, both are well-represented in historical novels.  However, despite the undoubted romantic appeal of the penniless companion and the impoverished seamstress, neither position provides the wealth of literary possibilities inherent in the role of governess.

Whether the novel is a Gothic, a romance, a mystery, or a comedy of manners, the character of governess is perfectly at home.  At her wise, intellectual best, she is a creditable heroine.  At her narrow-minded, tyrannical worst, she is a formidable villain.  And when combined with the various misdemeanors and mishaps of her young charges, she provides the perfect comic foil.

The New Governess by Edmund Blair Leighton, (1853-1922).
The New Governess
by Edmund Blair Leighton, (1853-1922).

One of the most idealized versions of a governess in English literature is that of Miss Taylor in Jane Austen’s Emma (1815).  Austen describes the unique relationship between Emma and Miss Taylor:

“Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse’s family, less as a governess than a friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly of Emma.  Between them it was more the intimacy of sisters.  Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor’s judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.”

Governesses were seldom held in such high esteem by the families who employed them – a fact which Austen acknowledges through the character of Jane Fairfax.  In the following scene, the meddling Mrs. Elton has been badgering Jane about finding employment as a governess.  Jane responds:

“There are places in town, offices, where inquiry would soon produce something—Offices for the sale—not quite of human flesh—but of human intellect.”

“Oh! my dear, human flesh!  You quite shock me; if you mean a fling at the slave-trade, I assure you Mr. Suckling was always rather a friend to the abolition.”

“I did not mean, I was not thinking of the slave-trade,” replied Jane; “governess-trade, I assure you, was all that I had in view; widely different certainly as to the guilt of those who carry it on; but as to the greater misery of the victims, I do not know where it lies.”

Arrival of a New Governess in a Merchant's House by Vasily Perov, 1866.
Arrival of a New Governess in a Merchant’s House by Vasily Perov, 1866.

The role of governess was, in reality, a solitary and often miserable existence.  Author Susan Ridout addresses this in her somewhat depressing 19th century book of advice, Letters to a Young Governess on the Principles of Education and Other Subjects Connected with Her Duties (1840):

“Consider therefore, before you enter a family, how far you are able to support the solitude into which you must be thrown, in such a situation.  It is not now a separation merely from friends and relations to which you are called; it is a seclusion from society altogether, at least from any which sympathizes with you.”

Employing a Governess by Emily Shanks, (1857-1936).
Employing a Governess by Emily Shanks, (1857-1936).

The governess was neither servant, nor family member and, as such, was often relegated to a sort of lonely social no man’s land.  Ridout warns young governesses to be careful of how they attempt to alleviate that loneliness:

“Discontent, Mortification, or mere Sorrow of heart will suggest various means, by which you could possibly escape from such endurance; and I fear that many young women have taken steps under these unhappy feelings, which they must have deplored for the remainder of their lives.”

One can only imagine what sort of deplorable steps our poor young governess has taken.  Has she succumbed to the advances of one of the young gentlemen in the household?  Not that it particularly matters.  As Ridout explains in a roundabout way, whether the masculine attentions are welcome or unwelcome, if a governess is compromised by a gentleman of the family, it is her own fault.

“…if there are young men in the family where you reside, remember that your carriage will generally govern theirs; they will not presume, if you are discreet and unpretending.”

The New Governess by Thomas Ballard, (1836-1908).
The New Governess
by Thomas Ballard, (1836-1908).

The standards imposed on governesses were indeed onerous.  Not only were they required to be proficient in all the relevant subjects, they were expected to be veritable pattern cards of Christian virtue and propriety.  In exchange, they received small wages and virtually no job security.  A passage from the Countess of Blessington’s 1840 novel, The Governess, provides an extreme example of the vast disparity between employment requirements and compensation:

“READ this advertisement, my dear Clara,” said Mrs. Waller to her niece; “perhaps it may suit you.  I have only looked at the two first lines, so read it aloud.”  Clara complied, and perused the following lines from the Morning Post:

“Wanted, in a highly distinguished family, a person as governess, to undertake the education of three young ladies, of the ages of nine, seven, and five.  She must be of a prepossessing appearance, of refined manners, and a perfect musician.  She is required to instruct her pupils in French, Italian, and English, geography and the use of the globes, with music, drawing, and dancing; in all which branches of education she is expected to be a proficient.  Equanimity of temper and cheerfulness of disposition, joined to uninterrupted health, are indispensable requisites.  She must understand cutting out and making the children’s dresses.  Salary twenty-five guineas a year.  Address No. —, Brook Street, Grosvenor Square, between the hours of two and four.”

“Twenty-five guineas a-year!” exclaimed Mrs. Waller, as her niece laid down the paper; “and a list of accomplishments, with moral and physical perfections, required, that never yet fell to the lot of one human being.  How much money and time must have been spent to acquire even half such accomplishments, and yet for all these, the wages of a lady’s maid are offered.  Oh! my poor Clara, this will never do.”

The Governess by Emily Mary Osborn, 1860.
The Governess by Emily Mary Osborn, 1860.

Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847)features one of the most famous depictions of a governess in all of English literature.  Proving that even a young woman with no beauty, no money, and no connections can be the heroine of her own story, Jane leaves the oppressive Lowood School to take a position as governess at Thornfield Hall.  There, she meets the mysterious Mr. Rochester and experiences firsthand the particular miseries of a governess who falls in love with her employer.  In the following scene, Jane is forced to sit in the drawing room amongst Mr. Rochester’s guests and listen as the beautiful Blanche Ingram and the rest of the assembled company deride her profession.

“Why, I suppose you have a governess for her: I saw a person with her just now— is she gone?   Oh, no! there she is still, behind the window-curtain.  You pay her, of course; I should think it quite as expensive,— more so; for you have them both to keep in addition.”

I feared— or should I say, hoped?— the allusion to me would make Mr. Rochester glance my way; and I involuntarily shrank farther into the shade: but he never turned his eyes.

“I have not considered the subject,” said he indifferently, looking straight before him.

“No, you men never do consider economy and common sense.  You should hear mama on the chapter of governesses: Mary and I have had, I should think, a dozen at least in our day; half of them detestable and the rest ridiculous, and all incubi— were they not, mama?”

Mrs. Ingram answers her daughter in brutal fashion, not only expressing her dislike of governesses as a whole – claiming to have suffered a martyrdom from their “incompetency and caprice” – but criticizing Jane herself:

“I am a judge of physiognomy, and in hers I see all the faults of her class.”

The Governess by Rebecca Solomon, 1851.
The Governess by Rebecca Solomon, 1851.

Not every literary governess is content with fading into the background.  In Vanity Fair (1847) by William Makepeace Thackeray, Becky Sharp aspires to better things and is not opposed to a bit of treachery in order to get them.  Employed as a governess by the Crawley family, she meets and secretly marries the dashing Captain Rawdon Crawley.  For a time, she enjoys phenomenal success in society, but in spite of her ingratiating ways – or perhaps because of them – there are many who refuse to accept Becky as anything other than a governess.  The Sedley’s housekeeper, Mrs. Blenkinsop, is one of them.

“I don’t trust them governesses, Pinner,” she remarked to the maid.  “They give themselves the hairs and hupstarts of ladies, and their wages is no better than you nor me.”

Lessons by Helen Allingham, (1848-1926).
Lessons by Helen Allingham, (1848-1926).

Novelist Georgette Heyer references governesses in many of her Regency era novels, but in The Reluctant Widow (1946) she casts one as her heroine.  At the start of the book, Elinor Rochdale is en route to take up the unenviable position of governess to a temperamental seven-year-old boy.  Heyer writes:

“Six years earlier, Miss Rochdale would have shrunk from the horrors so clearly in store for her, but those years had taught her that the ideal situation was rarely to be found, and that where there was no spoiled child to make the governess’s life a burden, she would in all likelihood be expected to save her employer’s purse by performing the menial tasks generally allotted to the second housemaid.”

As a result of a mix-up, Elinor arrives at a different house entirely.  There she meets Lord Carlyon who makes her a rather shocking proposition.  At first, Elinor is disposed to refuse him, but since the alternative is – as Carlyon describes it – a “life of drudgery” in the role of governess, she accepts his offer.

The Lesson by Jules Trayer, 1861.
The Lesson by Jules Trayer, 1861.

Governesses feature in many more classic works of English literature, including The Turn of the Screw (1897) by Henry James and Agnes Grey (1847) by Anne Brontë.  Of course, the real life 19th century governess had none of the limitless possibilities of her literary counterpart.  There were no wealthy gentlemen employers waiting to fall in love with her, no dramatic mix-ups resulting in her marrying a dying stranger, and no unexpected inheritances that freed her from her life of service.  Instead, she was very much a genteel prisoner of her respectable position.  Thank goodness authors of the 19th century were not confined to writing her that way.

Mimi Matthews is the USA Today bestselling author of The Matrimonial Advertisement, The Pug Who Bit Napoleon, and A Victorian Lady’s Guide to Fashion and Beauty. She researches and writes on all aspects of nineteenth century history—from animals, art, and etiquette to fashion, beauty, feminism, and law.

Sources

Austen, Jane.  Emma.  Ed. George Justice.  Norton Critical Editions. 4th ed. New York: Norton, 2011.

Brontë, Charlotte.  Jane Eyre.  Ed. Richard Dunn.  Norton Critical Editions.  3rd ed.  New York: Norton, 2000.

Brontë, Anne.  Agnes Gray.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

Gardiner, Marguerite, Countess of Blessington.  “The Governess and The Belle of the Season.”  Collection on Ancient and Modern British Authors, Vol. GCLXII.  Paris: Baudry’s European Library, 1840.

Heyer, Georgette.  The Reluctant Widow.  Chicago: Sourcebooks, 2008.

James, Henry.  The Turn of the Screw and Other Stories.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Ridout, Susan.  Letters to a Young Governess on the Principles of Education and Other Subjects Connected with her Duties.  London: Edmund Fry, 1840.

Thackeray, William Makepeace.  Vanity Fair.  Ed. Peter Shillingsburg.  Norton Critical Editions. 1st ed. New York: Norton, 1994.

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Sarah Waldock
Sarah Waldock
5 years ago

Thank you for another excellent post! I’m using impoverished girls who are being trained to be governesses in my Charity School series, of which the first, Elinor’s Endowment, I’ve just published, and there are so many potential plots, I have outlines for 9 stories of a planned 6-book series. There is some mileage to be got out of companions too though, I’ve married off one, in Hasty Proposal, and had a murderous one in my Jane and Caleb series. But it must have been unenviable to be neither part of the family, and yet, being a lady, not part of… Read more »

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  Sarah Waldock

Thanks for commenting, Sarah! I’m glad you enjoyed my article. It sounds like you know firsthand how versatile a governess can be as a character in a historical romance! You’re right about their real life circumstances being unenviable. I can’t imagine how hard it must have been to exist on the fringes of society – especially if it was a society they had once been a part of.

Faith
Faith
5 years ago

The Heyer book that comes to mind when I think governess is The Nonesuch and Ancilla Trent, more than Elinor Rochdale of The Reluctant Widow – who never is a governess. I read The Nonesuch not long after reading Agnes Grey. My goodness! I have to say Ancilla Trent won my heart! Both women must deal with troublesome charges and both find love but one has a sense of humor and confidence springing from her intelligence and the other is so very, very gloomy. . . .

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  Faith

Thanks for commenting, Faith! Ancilla Trent is a wonderful character and practically a saint for dealing with Tiffany (one of the most insufferable characters in Heyer’s novels). It’s true Elinor did not go on to be a governess in the remainder of The Reluctant Widow, but that was my point. She started as a governess with only grim prospects and (thanks to the miracle of fiction) was enabled to live out an entirely different story. Also, she illustrates the drudgery often involved with being a governess, both in her speech and in her actions – preferring to marry a dying,… Read more »

widget85
widget85
5 years ago

What an interesting article – and lovely artwork. Characters who exist in the liminal spaces between social classes are always fascinating – and as you say, so often lonely. At least fiction occasionally gave them the chance to run riot…

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  widget85

Thanks for the comment, Widget! I’m glad you enjoyed my article. I love the artwork, too. It’s speaks volumes about the real life role of the poor governess. Thank goodness for fiction!

Elizabeth Bailey
Elizabeth Bailey
5 years ago

Yes, I’ve used them too. A trilogy of heroines at a charity school trained to be governesses. It was lovely to give them their share of romance for a change. As you say, limitless possibilities.

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago

Thanks for the comment, Elizabeth! So glad to hear you’ve used governesses in your stories too. They make wonderful characters!

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  Sarah Waldock

Thank you for sharing them, Sarah!

Elizabeth Bailey
Elizabeth Bailey
5 years ago

Mimi kindly said I might reference my governess books here. They are Prudence, Nell and Kitty, though only Kitty is available on kindle at the moment. Here’s a link: http://www.amazon.com/Kitty-Mills-Historical-Elizabeth-Bailey-ebook/dp/B00OKIKSMS/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1434480056&sr=1-1&keywords=kitty+elizabeth+bailey – Thanks, Mimi!

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago

Thank you so much for sharing, Elizabeth!

Sarah Waldock
Sarah Waldock
5 years ago

Oh I’ve read Nell, and enjoyed it very much, so did my mother, I thoroughly recommend it! Now I know there are others I shall go looking for Large Print for her!

Alison Center
Alison Center
5 years ago

I enjoyed your article very much. I have just started receiving them. I kept thinking about the funny governess in “The Importance of Being Earnest” who mixed up the baby with her novel! In thinking about Miss Taylor in “Emma”, she must have been very young when she started to be able to marry and have her own child when Emma was 21. Your article made me wonder about modern day nannies – I just looked up a typical job description that expected the nanny to care for the children by getting them up and dressed, feeding them their meals,… Read more »

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  Alison Center

I’m so glad you liked my article, Alison! Thank you for your thoughtful comment – and your research into modern day nanny jobs. What a lot is expected of nannies today and for so little! Much as in the 19th century, it all feels very unfair, especially since governesses and nannies are essentially raising someone’s children for them. I wonder what it is about this position that results in it being consistently devalued throughout history. I fear it might be simply because it is a woman’s occupation. :(

Sarah Waldock
Sarah Waldock
5 years ago
Reply to  Mimi Matthews

But not usually as unsafe a job as Lord Lucan’s children’s nanny ….

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  Sarah Waldock

What a sad tale that was! The poor nanny.

monicadescalzi
monicadescalzi
5 years ago

Delightful post! I’m such a sucker for a good old governess story :) Too bad real life differed so much from fictional accounts – though not quite so much from poor Jane Fairfax’s expectations … Yet Jane Austen allowed herself to dream on behalf of her friend Anne Sharpe: “Poor thing! she has been suffering indeed, but is now in a comparative state of comfort. She is at Sir W. P.’s, in Yorkshire, with the children, and there is no appearance of her quitting them … She writes highly of Sir Wm. I do so want him to marry her… Read more »

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  monicadescalzi

Glad you liked it Monica :) I think, being from a modest background herself, Jane Austen was sympathetic to governesses. And the Bronte sisters, of course, had first hand experience! I love the letters from Jane to her sister Cassandra. Thanks for including an excerpt in your comment. So nice to see her aspiring to better things for her governess friend!

alessandraquattrocchi
alessandraquattrocchi
5 years ago

great piece. And sad reflections. Of course it was the only profession available to a genteel lady…

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago

I’m glad you liked it Alessandra. Thank you so much for commenting. The options for genteel ladies in reduced circumstances were, indeed, very limited. They could also try to find a place as a ladies companion, but that was no picnic either. Thank goodness women have more options today!

shandalier
shandalier
5 years ago

Reblogged this on shandalier and commented:
Nicely done!! (And don’t get me wrong, I spent many a rainy summer afternoon as a young lady reading Phyllis Whitney’s Gothic Romances and wishing I could be a governess pining with love for a mysterious dark-haired widower.)

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  shandalier

I’m glad you enjoyed it, Shandalier! Thanks for the reblog. I think you’re not the only young lady who imagined themselves as a governess in a gothic :) Authors make the profession sound so much more romantic than it really was.

Sarah M. Fredericks
Sarah M. Fredericks
5 years ago

Dear Mimi,
I thoroughly enjoyed your article on governesses represented in literature. Yes, Jane Eyre is probably the most famous governess. However, her “charge” Little Adèle was a lot easier to manage than poor Agnes Grey’s unruly children. I love Anne Brontë’s power of observation and unsentimental honesty as she describes the Ill treatment Agnes receives from her employers. Hmmm…I must read this again.😊
Regards
Sarah
copleyclassics.com

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago

Thank you so much for your comment, Sarah! You’re right, Adele was a very easy charge compared to most others in literature. I hate to think how poor Anne Bronte’s personal experience as a governess might have informed her story. We know that some were treated well while others were treated as if they were invisible – or worse. Enjoy reading Agnes Grey again! I love the Bronte sisters work :)

Angelyn
Angelyn
5 years ago

Ha! I have been trolling lately for snippets on Heyer governess characters like Ancilla Trent and lo! I find you at the forefront of commentary. I’m not surprised. Well done, Mimi!l

Mimi Matthews
Mimi Matthews
5 years ago
Reply to  Angelyn

Thanks Angelyn :). This is actually one of the top three viewed articles on my site. I had no idea how popular governesses were!

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